Take action! Become an Abolitionista!

HOTLINE

If you or someone you know is under 18 years old and has a pimp or a manager and is having sex for money, then you are a victim of human trafficking. 

For help call 1-888-373-7888, or text “HELP” to BEFREE (233733), or email at help@humantraffickinghotline.org.

 

Then, immediately tell an adult you can trust: a parent, teacher, police officer, school counselor, pastor, priest, rabbi or other religious leaders, and keep asking adults for help until someone takes action.

 

If you or someone you know is in immediate danger, please call 911.

Here are some signs that someone is a victim of human trafficking:

  • A young person having sex for money. (The law considers them victims of human trafficking.)

  • An immigrant whose ID or travel documents have been taken away.  (This is a typical way that human traffickers control their victims.)

  • Someone is being forced to work for someone that they owe money to. (This is also called debt bondage and is illegal.)

  • Someone who is being forced to stay at a job that they want to leave.  (This is a kind of slavery.)

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ONLINE SAFETY

You were born to like, share and post...but Abolitionistas also know that some of the people prowling the web are dangerous.  Here are a few simple rules that allow you to play safe online without becoming a victim of an online predator.

 

Don’t share your name, phone #, or home address online. And make sure your screen name doesn’t give any clue to your identity, gender, or location. It takes a predator about 10 minutes to find your identity and home address with just your real first name and screen name.

​Never meet face-to-face with anyone you meet online, unless you are accompanied by a parent.

If someone won’t stop sending you messages that are mean, pushy or creepy, take a screenshot, alert your parents or law enforcement or the social media platform that it was sent on. Then block the sender.

 

Sometimes people are not who they say they are.  Do a little research on a person before you believe who they are.

Never be mean or cruel to anyone online. Be part of the solution...not the problem.

Never post inappropriate pictures or videos.

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BILL OF RIGHTS

“We are Abolitionistas.  This is our code.  Repeat after me…”

  • I have the right to walk away from any situation that feels creepy, unsafe or inappropriate.

  • I have the right to tell anyone to stop touching me or leave me alone, and I have the right to make this request as loud as I can, especially if there are other people around.

  • I have the right to tell a trusted adult if someone touches me in an inappropriate or unsafe way.  

  • I will be on the lookout for predators that intend to do my friends or sisters and brothers harm.  

  • I will not give out my personal information online or meet face-to-face with someone that I met online.

  • I will save the number to the National Human Trafficking Hotline to my phone: 1-888-373-7888.

  • I will make a list of adults that I can go to for help (that might include parents, teachers, religious leaders, police officers,) and put their contact information in my phone.

  • I will talk to a trusted adult when any friend shows several of the most typical danger signs of being trafficked:

    • stops going to school

    • starts dressing in clothes that are too mature

    • loses interest in normal activities

    • shows visible signs of abuse

    • hangs out with older men

    • has multiple phones and pagers

    • contracts STDs, or becomes pregnant

    • begins talking about sexual activities

    • becomes depressed and withdrawn

  • I am special and important.  No one has the right to put me down or make me feel bad about myself.

  • I will live a life of courage, power, and inspiration.

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ACTION

“No matter how old you are, you can have a powerful impact on stopping the crime of human trafficking in your community and communities around the world. Here are some of the ways that you can make a difference.”

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  1. Invite your friends to read  ABOLITIONISTA!

  2. Be the host of a special ABOLITIONISTA! comic book workshop at your school, club, YMCA, or house of worship. Email us to book a workshop: workshops@savingjane.org

  3. Register for an ABOLITIONISTA! teachers training, and learn how to lead our special comic book workshops that teach kids about human trafficking. Email us for more information: workshops@savingjane.org

  4. Donate five dollars to a organization in your community that is working to stop human trafficking. Here are some ideas about how you can raise money: A) organize a community yard sale, B) at your birthday party, ask people to make a donation instead of giving you a gift, C) organize a music concert, dance concert, bake sale, movie night, comedy show, Halloween party, Valentine’s Day party, Fashion show, and ask people to make a donation for attending. 

  5. Become a social media crusader by sharing ABOLITIONISTA! on your social media pages.  You can also share articles, memes, videos, and anything that you learn about human trafficking on your social media pages.

  6. Create your own anti-trafficking videos and posts, and help raise awareness using your own voice.

  7. Organize screenings of films and documentaries about human trafficking.

  8. Start a club at your school about human trafficking.

  9. Look for a fair trade certification when buying chocolate and other products. Fair trade means that the product was produced without slave labor.

  10. Create a flyer or a poster that raises awareness about human trafficking and post it on public bulletin boards at school, stores, and houses of worship. Include the national hotline number: 1-888–373–7888

  11. Create an online petition on change.org, demanding that your community leaders take action by 1) making human trafficking education a part of your schools curriculum, 2) holding companies accountable for making sure their products are not being produced by slave labor, 3) making laws that provide housing and services for victims of human trafficking, 4) making the fight against human trafficking a part of your community’s agenda.